5 Tips To Accelerate Muscle Recovery

Many athletes believe that a good muscle recovery is achieved only through the intake of the right amount of supplements that promise quick and visible results. There is no doubt that they help, but they represent a small part of the whole. By following the right advice, supplements will work like real allies. Very often, the main concerns are directed to diet and training, and little importance is given to the recovery that, as we know, is directly related to muscle growth. Recovery is one of the factors that determine the results. No matter how intense the workouts are, if the body does not have time to recover, you will hardly manage to progress.

Recover does not mean to vegetate during three days. An interesting idea is to find ways to prepare the body for the next workouts. As? Follow the strategies …

1. Massage the muscles

A muscle massage a week, or every 15 days aside, of a sports masseur, can help to speed up recovery, to perceive and relieve muscle tension and possibly avoid injury. The specialist can also show you the most effective and most suitable recovery methods for your physical characteristics and the type of sport practiced.

2. Swim

Swimming, especially in salt water, is therapeutic for muscle pain. By swimming, all the muscles of the body will be in motion, without too much exertion. About 20 minutes are sufficient to stimulate the muscular relaxation of the arms, back and legs. Avoid violent movements.

3. Eat properly

When muscle glycogen stores are low after training/competition, hormonal changes occur that increase the ability to absorb glucose and amino acids. For this, it is recommended to ingest proteins and carbohydrates immediately after physical activity. Restoring the reserves helps the body recover, repair the tissues and become stronger for the next workout. Include quality amino acids supplements with your daily diet; you can buy amino acids online.

Studies show that the adequate amount of protein for bodybuilders is around 30% of its caloric need. For most bodybuilding practitioners this corresponds to about 1.5 – 2 g of protein per kg of body weight. Although protein can be ingested at any time of the day, it is advisable to consume it mainly before and after training, in this way it promotes recovery, strengthens the immune system and stimulates the increase in muscle mass. For those who want to increase strength, muscle, and definition, diets with few carbohydrates are not the most suitable, as these macronutrients provide the body with the molecules necessary to synthesize glycogen, which improves the athlete’s performance, stimulates the production of insulin.

4. Use compression clothing

Recent research has shown that using compression clothing during physical activity can help reduce recovery time between sets of exercises. The underlying idea is to reduce the muscle vibration that occurs with the impact of the body on the ground, so as to result in a more efficient muscle contraction. This compression effect helps to decrease the inflammatory process, reduces the size of any trauma and muscle pain.

5. Sleep well

Sleeping is the most effective way to recover physically and psychologically. If you do not sleep enough hours, little or nothing, you will need intense training and recovery methods that you use. Lack of sleep can make muscle recovery difficult and cause adverse effects to those hoped for, such as weight gain, weight loss, increased risk of chronic diseases, decreased performance, increased cortisol, reduced testosterone levels and of growth hormone, decreased protein synthesis, factors that inhibit normal muscle growth. According to a study conducted by the University of Chicago, when 10 individuals who slept 9 hours per night went to sleep for 5 hours, an exponential decrease in testosterone levels (14%) was observed during the day. The amount of hours of sleep varies from person to person, being from 7 to 9 hours the time that usually an adult individual needs.

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Russell Henry

The author is an expert on occupational training and a prolific writer who writes extensively on Business, technology, and education. He can be contacted for professional advice in matters related with occupation and training on his blog Communal Business and Your Business Magazine.

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